Cape Town

Interesting photo of a dandelion

What do you think of this pictures? It is just a weed growing on the side of the road, but the pic came out quite well. I quite like the contrast between the background and foreground.

Just a simple dandelion growing out of the pavement.

How to Braai – a visual guide

Rory Braai Dec 2008 065The braai is probably one of South Africa’s most traditional meals. It is practised by all cultures in South Africa, and as often as possible! Probably the only thing that will prevent a South African from having a braai is a rugby game, in which case they will probably simply braai before or after the game!

If you drive through any suburb in South Africa on a summer weekend, you will smell the delicious smell of grilling meat.

Braaing is a very casual and social affair, but there it is taken quite seriously by the cook. You simply NEVER interfere with somebody else’s braai without asking them very politely first (even if the meat is burning!)

So, what exactly is a braai?

Very simple really, it is a South African BBQ. However, it is almost always cooked on wood or charcoal – very seldom on gas. A braai will typically consist of one or more of the following:

  • lamb cutlets (chops)
  • sausage (boere wors – literally farm sausage made from beef)
  • traditional pork sausages
  • beef steak
  • chicken pieces or kebabs
  • beef or pork ribs

Let’s get going

You will need a braai (in which to make the fire). Many public picnic sites have brick braai’s available, or a Weber will do. You will also need wood or charcoal – we often buy “brikettes”, which are small round compressed pieces of charcoal.

Blitz, which is a paraffin-based firelighter, helps to get the fire going, but if you are a boy scout, matches and an axe will do!

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Put a few pieces of the blitz (firelighter) onto the grid
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Light the blitz. and give the coals a few minutes to start burning. Note that with the braai, you will always use “direct heat”.
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Lighting the wood fire
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Some nice coals starting to burn – it should take about 40 minutes to get good coals.
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While waiting for the wood to burn, cook some garlic bread on the fire.
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Garlic bread ready to eat – yummy!
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From top to bottomĀ – wors (beef sausage), chicken, and chicken kebabs in the front. You can also see some ostrich kebabs at the top on the far right.
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Braaing is thirsty work – you will need plenty of liquid refreshments
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When you can hold your hand above the grid for three seconds, you are ready to cook. Put the meat onto the grid, turning every few minutes or so.
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Looking good – almost ready to eat.
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After about two beers (40 minutes or so), you are ready to eat, so dig in!
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Ready to eat – looks great, doesn’t it?
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After a good braai, the plates will be empty!
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One more think, we often have “bring and braai’s”, in which the host supplies the fire, rolls and salads, and the guests all bring their own meat and drinks. Simple and easy.

Ducks on Vergenoegd Wine Estate

Yesterday we celebrated Lois’ dad’s 70th birthday party at the Pomegranate restaurant at Vergenoegd wine estate. They have turned the old manor house into the restaurant.

While having lunch, I saw the most strange thing – a duck parade! The farm has about 300 Indian runner ducks living on the farm. These ducks run through the vinyards, looking for snails and small insects to eat. This novel solution to pest control keeps the vineyards pest-free in an environmentally friendly manner.

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So, in the middle of lunch, about 100 ducks came marching through the outside of the restaurnant, much like a class of school children out on a school outing.

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They marched onto the lawns, ate everything in site (at least all the snails), and left. Thinking about it, it sounds more like varsity students than school kids.

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Although they are both noisy and smelly, it is kind-of cute to watch. And I was really glad that I had decided to order the fish and not the duck that was on the lunch menu!

If you get the opportunity to go to the farm, do so. It is not something that you will see everyday!

Seared tuna…

One of the great things about summer in Cape Town, is the ample supply of fresh yellow-fin tuna.

Seared tuna

There is nothing that can beat freshly seared tuna, cooked on hot coals. It is a gloriously warm summer evening, so I decided to cook fresh tuna on my father’s old gas grille. You need to heat the grill at least 1/2 hour before cooking, and cook the tuna for about a minute MAX each side, but it is magic, tender and melting in the month. Just look at how it turned out.

The grill entered our family in the early 80’s, so it has been in the family for over 30 years. My father gave it to me in a weak moment a few years ago, and has been asking for it back ever since.

It still cooks the best beef steaks in Africa, and as you can see, the best tuna as well.

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